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Solidarity of Others in a Divided World

A Postmodern Theology After Postmodernism

Solidarity of Others in a Divided World

A Postmodern Theology After Postmodernism

This item is a print on demand title and will be dispatched in 1-3 weeks.

Paperback / softback

£37.99

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
ISBN: 9780567025708
Number of Pages: 256
Published: 01/06/2004
Width: 15.6 cm
Height: 23.4 cm
The globalization of the world brings together different groups into common space and produces a twofold dialectic, the dialectic of differentiation in which we are made increasingly aware of differences in nationality, culture, religion, ethnicity, gender, class, and language, and the dialectic of interdependence in which we are compelled to find a way of living together despite our differences. The central challenge of the globalizing world is how to manage and transform this twofold, antithetical dialectic of simultaneous differentiation and interdependence into a solidarity of others. The task of contemporary Christian theology is to interpret this demand of the new kairos in light of its biblical and theological tradition and provide a conceptually coherent, systematic mediation between the context of globalization and the demand of its inherited faith. The Christian tradition provides abundant resources worth retrieving for this theological purpose: the example of the historical Jesus in his solidarity with the marginalized others of society, his crucifixion and resurrection as signs of his solidarity in suffering and hope, the triune God as a communion of three persons in their difference, the incarnation as solidarity of the human and divine in their radical difference. Using the paradigm of 'solidarity of others' as the central theme of theology, it is possible and appropriate to renew the doctrine of the Holy Spirit as the Spirit of solidarity and recapture the inspiring and illuminating potential of the classical, authentically Christian metaphor of the 'body of Christ' as embodiment of this solidarity.

Anselm Kyongsuk Min

Min negotiates difficult terrain gracefully: in the name of difference, he denounces all tendencies to totality, universalism and unchanging essences emphasizing the strength of postmodernism as the commitment to justice and calling for a 'heterological imperative' or a willingness to subject our convictions to the challenge, views and identities of others (p.62). --Sanford Lakoff

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